Your New Messages to Jennifer Katharine Gates - Amir Alipour

Your New Messages to Jennifer Katharine Gates - Amir Alipour

Thursday, May 30, 2013

the gates notes : Five Questions from the Twitterverse

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 Five Questions from the Twitterverse

Last week, I did an onstage Q&A with Twitter founder Jack Dorsey at the annual investors summit hosted by Vinod Khosla. Jack also solicited questions from the Twitterverse. Here are my thoughts on a few of the questions from his followers.
Twitter question for Bill Gates: Solar
BILL GATES: @barronstechblog, the great advantage of solar and wind is that they don’t require fuel. They also have disadvantages. One is that, to reach the scale we need, they require energy farms that cover many square miles. Another is that they are intermittent. What do you do when the sun doesn’t shine or the wind doesn’t blow? If you depend on these sources, you need some way of getting the energy during those time periods when it’s not available.

Twitter question for Bill Gates: 20 years old
BILL GATES: When it comes to technology, there are four areas where I think a lot of exciting things will happen in the coming decades: big data, machine learning, genomics, and ubiquitous computing. So if I were 20 years old today, I’d be looking into one (or maybe more!) of those fields.
@fesja, I’d like to think that I also would be far more aware of the problems of the world’s poorest people than I was when I was 20. This is my one big regret from the time I spent in college.  When I left Harvard, I had no real awareness of the disparities of health, and wealth, and opportunity that affect millions of people. It took me decades to find out about these things, and to start trying to do something about them.
Young people today have amazing opportunities. You have communications technology that I never had at that age, and you are far more aware of global inequity. So whether it’s in the career you pick or a volunteer project you do on the side, you can start sooner than I did.
 
BILL GATES: @realshawnisaac, Right now, polio is the single disease I’m spending the most time on, because we’re so close to eradicating it. It exists in just three countries: Nigeria, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. If we can wipe it out completely, it’ll be only the second time humanity has eradicated a disease (the first was smallpox).
It’s hard to single out one disease after polio, but there are several areas where the world will make a lot of progress in the coming years. For example, our foundation is very focused on malaria. New drugs will drive down the number of malaria deaths dramatically.  Another example is tuberculosis;  the drugs and diagnostic tools we have today are good enough to cut the death rate by quite a bit, but it will take 6 or 7 years before we have the innovations that allow us to start talking about eradicating TB.
BILL GATES: No matter how much money you have, you can’t buy time, @DanPierson. There are only 24 hours in every person’s day. So I set clear priorities, like my family and my work, and am pretty hardcore about sticking to them. It helps that I’m lucky enough to be able to free up some time by choosing not to do certain things. For example, I don’t mow the lawn.
BILL GATES: @JohnValentine2, I had an interesting discussion with the journalist Thomas Friedman about this topic last year, which you can watch here.
As I told Tom, it’s no secret that American politics are pretty polarized right now. Personally, I’d like to see more of our leaders take a technocratic approach to solving our biggest problems.
I know some people use “technocrat” as an insult, but I mean it as a compliment. We should be asking ourselves: Given the things that the country wants to get done, what’s the most efficient way to accomplish them? In areas like our energy supply or the budget, the current course won’t get us where we want to go. So the debate should be focused on the choices that are available to us.  What are the facts? What do the numbers tell us about what’s working and what isn’t?
That’s essentially what we try to do with the foundation. For example, we’re trying to help improve the U.S. education system. I wake up every day asking myself, how can we provide some examples of what works? How can we identify what makes a teacher really effective, and help all teachers be as good as the best ones? I think the country would have healthier political debates if more of our leaders brought a similar analytic approach to their work.

Bill gates Conversation with Bill Clinton at the 2013 Fiscal Summit


It's always stimulating to talk with President Clinton, and last Monday I was lucky enough to join him on stage at the Peterson Foundation's Fiscal Summit. We did a Q&A session for nearly an hour on budget and policy questions, foreign aid, American competitiveness, and education. And that was just part of the discussion, which was hosted by the Today show's Tamron Hall.http://www.thegatesnotes.com/~/media/Images/GatesNotes/Billboards/Fiscal_summit_310.jpg

President Clinton has been a terrific advocate for Africa, and has done amazing work in philanthropy through his foundation and the Clinton Global Initiative, so it was great to catch up with him. We agreed on the need to address both the short-term and long-term fiscal problems facing the United States, particularly with a view toward keeping the country competitive in the global marketplace and the need to invest in basic research and education.

At the end of the session, Tamron asked about the possibility of a strong, well-respected female candidate for president who has extensive international experience – and then turned to me and asked me whether Melinda was considering a run. I'm sure she would be flattered, but we both love the jobs we have. I told Tamron I don't think she'll be throwing her hat in the ring.

Bill gates Conversation with Bill Clinton at the 2013 Fiscal Summit

Friday, December 14, 2012

Best advice: Gates on Gates

The father-and-son duo talk about what it was like growing up Gates as they reflect on the advice that has influenced their careers and their relationship. 

Gates on Gates
PARIS (Fortune) -- It's certainly a unique father-son relationship. The man who created one of the largest fortunes in history, now in his second career as a philanthropist, has his dad working for him as co-chair of the world's largest charitable organization -- the $27.5 billion Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Actually, this is a second act for both men. Bill Gates, 53, stepped down from day-to-day work at Microsoft last June, while his father, Bill Gates Sr., 83, retired from the prominent Seattle law firm Preston Gates & Ellis (now known as K&L Gates), in 1998. These days both men give counsel to each other, but for years, of course, Dad doled out indispensable advice to his son. I recently sat down with this unlikely buddy act in the famed Leonard Bernstein suite at the Hôtel de Crillon on Paris's Place de la Concorde to ask them about the best advice they ever got.
Bill, I'd like to ask you about the best advice that you've ever gotten from your dad.
Bill Gates: Well, my dad and my mom were great at encouraging me as a kid to do things that I wasn't good at, to go out for a lot of different sports like swimming, football, soccer, and I didn't know why. At the time I thought it was kind of pointless, but it ended up really exposing me to leadership opportunities and showing me that I wasn't good at a lot of things, instead of sticking to things that I was comfortable with. It was fantastic, and now some of those activities I cherish. They had to stick to it because I pushed back a lot, but it was fantastic advice.
Mr. Gates, do you remember specifically dispensing advice, or was it something that was just a natural part of parenting?
Bill Gates Sr.: I think to some extent his mother and I were explicit about this, but it was mostly just instinctive. We did feel like he ought to go turn out, go and play on the neighborhood softball team and things of that kind. We thought it would be good for him and that he'd enjoy it, and apparently it turned out to be good advice.
B.G.: Even though I wasn't very good at it.
B.G. SR.: You were okay.
You make it sound very easy, but all of us who are parents know that raising a family is not always that way. In your new book you mentioned dinners on Sunday nights and wearing the same kind of pajamas [on Christmas]. Does that stuff really work, Mr. Gates?
B.G. SR.: Well, I guess on the basis of one family's experience, my answer is a loud yes.
What do you think, Bill?
B.G.: I think family traditions that get you to come together and talk about what you're up to -- going on trips together, always sitting at dinner and sharing thoughts -- really made a huge difference. We learned from our parents what they were trying to do, whether it was United Way or a volunteering activity or the world of business. I felt very equipped as I was dealing with adults to talk to them in a comfortable fashion because my parents had shared how they thought about things.
Things weren't always so smooth, though, between the two of you. Like any father and son, you've had some rocky moments, right?
B.G.: That's right. I don't think I was easy to bring up. I had a lot of energy and stubbornness about things that I wanted to do. At one juncture, when I was in my last year of high school, I got a job offer and it would take me away from school, and I was amazed that my dad, after meeting with the headmaster and getting all the data, said, "Yeah, that's something you can go and do." Most of the rockiness had been before that, when I was still confused about, was I trying to prove something vs. my parents. There was actually a professional who I went and visited, who my parents had me chat with. [That person] explained to me that there wasn't really any benefit to fighting with my parents. It was all about the issues, the battles were going to be about the real world, and they were really on my side. And that was fantastic. It just changed my mindset. I was only 12 or 13 at the time. I think it made things a lot smoother from that point on.
A lot of times 12- and 13-year-olds are told that their parents are not their enemies, and it goes in one ear and out the other. Yet you were able to actually take this advice and listen to it, and you began to become closer to your parents after that?
B.G.: That's right. As I was starting Microsoft (MSFT, Fortune 500), I'd go over on Sundays and share with my parents what the challenges were and get some thoughts, just vent about what was complicated. I remember when we were taking the company public, I was saying that I thought that would have some real drawbacks, and we talked about how to mitigate those.
So there was a lot of camaraderie that came from the fact that we'd gotten on an even keel, and they were very encouraging even though it was a business that was mysterious in some ways. The scale of the opportunity was beyond what would have been predicted.
You guys have this incredible working relationship, and obviously a close familial one as well. What do you think the secret to that is?
B.G. SR.: One of the [best pieces of advice] I ever had is related to what you just asked about, and that is the business of getting along with and encouraging the right things with your youngsters. Bill's mother and I early on were involved in parent effectiveness training, [an] activity at the church we went to. And the thing that the people there taught us and emphasized, which is so central and so significant, is that you should never demean your child. When you think about the centrality of that, in terms of the relationship with an offspring, you're off to a really good start. I'm a great fan of my son's. I think he's an incredible citizen and a wonderful businessman, and we let that show in the things we do together.
B.G.: I think it's because we have well-defined roles. I'm kind of a driving, "Why haven't we gotten all these things done?" [kind of person], and dad is the voice of wisdom. We'll be having a meeting, talking about the calendar or the cost or those things, and he'll make a comment that will get everybody to stop and think, You know, we missed that way of looking at things. And his being there at the foundation full-time really has shaped the values. When we have the foundation meeting, people get up and applaud because they see that that really makes a difference. And to create a family foundation, when I was busy, and yet to know that the values were going to be right and strong, I give credit for that to my dad.
And your son maybe didn't always take your advice, Mr. Gates. I mean when he told you he was going to drop out of Harvard, what did you say to him?
B.G. SR.: Well, the first time he said he was going to take a period away and then go back, the emphasis was on, well, he will go back. Second time around, after he did go back, then he again felt like he had to go to Albuquerque, where the company was, and work there more. We were much more concerned the second time. The company was becoming very demanding, and Paul Allen was out there in Albuquerque, and Bill needed to help him.
Bill, let me ask you about another one of your mentors. What's the best advice Warren Buffett has ever given you?
B.G.: Well, I've gotten a lot of great advice from Warren. I'd say one of the most interesting is how he keeps things simple. You look at his calendar, it's pretty simple. You talk to him about a case where he thinks a business is attractive, and he knows a few basic numbers and facts about it. And [if] it gets less complicated, he feels like then it's something he'll choose to invest in. He picks the things that he's got a model of, a model that really is predictive and that's going to continue to work over a long-term period. And so his ability to boil things down, to just work on the things that really count, to think through the basics -- it's so amazing that he can do that. It's a special form of genius.
If you're getting too balled up with a lot of complicated things on your schedule, do you actually go back and think, What would Warren do?
B.G.: Yeah, sure. I think Warren is so nice to everybody -- how does he say no in a nice way? Or how does he think about priorities and have that explicitly in mind? And he turns down an unbelievable number of things, and yet everybody feels great about it. His grace in talking to people where he's always saying, you know, "You probably understand this better than I do, but here's how I messed it up when I first got involved in this." You know, that's a special talent, and I do find myself thinking, Hmm, how would Warren say this in a friendly fashion?
There was a case at the annual meeting where somebody asked a question about should you sell the stocks that have gone up and keep the ones that have not? And he sort of said, "No, you look at the value of the business." And then Charlie [Munger] added, "He's telling you your conceptual framework is all wrong." Which is in fact what the answer had been, but there wasn't one element of, "Hey, dummy ..."
What about growing up, Bill? Teachers in high school or at Harvard? Were there any experiences you had there where you got a piece of advice that kind of gave you an ah-ha moment?
B.G.: Well, my parents were nice enough to have me go to a great high school. It was a private high school. And a lot of the teachers there were very encouraging in my math and science and giving me the books that they liked, letting me read ahead. And the whole computer experience, the exposure came because Lakeside was sort of forward-looking. They were truly amazing -- that when the teachers found it too confusing, they let the students take over. Most schools would have just, I don't know, shut the thing down or something. It was a very weird deal where we kind of took charge and even the whole way we started using computers to pick when the classes would meet -- that was a friend and I in charge of doing that.
So they had a comfort, and you know, there were a few teachers that I would give a lot of credit to -- they let us go and dream about where we would take it.
Do you remember their names?
B.G.: Yeah, Fred Wright was the key person who ran the math department, and I think [he] deserves most of the credit. There was a physics teacher, Gary Maestretti, who encouraged me. Even when I was first in 8th Grade, and I was doing very well on these national tests, a guy named Paul Stocklim was incredible at just saying -- Hey, you should have more confidence. You're really good at this stuff. Getting that kind of encouragement -- it was very helpful, and that was a great environment. All those teachers were thoughtful. I think I got more than my fair share of their energy because, you know, I was so excited about the subjects and the frontiers. They kept throwing new stuff at me because of that.
So Mr. Gates, why did you decide to write this book? In this book, there's a fair amount of advice and learning, and obviously, you feel compelled to share some of that. What was it that prompted you to do this?
B.G. SR.: It started with writing a memoir and really as much as anything, my colleague in that work, someone by the name of Mary Ann Mackin whose name is on the cover of the book, encouraged me to think in terms of making it more of a book than just one that I would give to the family or friends as a memoir. I was reluctant about that, to be candid, but she persisted, and finally, well, okay, okay, let's go that way. And I'm delighted that I decided to. It's really been an interesting experience. I mean it's an industry I knew nothing about, and it's really revealing and fun to see how the book business works, and I'm tickled with the book.
Has it surprised you that you've met all manner of associates and friends of your son's and that these people have ended up being peers and people that you work with? Did you ever imagine that would come to pass that way?
B.G. SR.: No, no, that isn't the kind of thing you would expect to occur, and you describe it well. It's a surprise. It's not a prediction I would have made, the way my life was going to work.
Who were some of your son's associates or friends that you feel have really contributed to your learning process?
B.G. SR.: Well, a good many of them. Certainly, his two key associates, Paul Allen and Steve Ballmer, would be in that category. Very bright, insightful, thoughtful human beings.
B.G.: And I'd also say probably Patty Stonesifer.
B.G. SR.: Yes.
Gates on Gates
B.G.: Together with my dad, [Patty] really created the foundation, the whole approach, the values. I think the integrity, humility. Together with Patty they thought through a lot of things so that once I was ready to go full-time, it was a thriving concern that was pretty far into some interesting, complex problems. And so it's been an incredible gift for me that as I move over, it's not a startup, it's a going concern with amazing people, and Dad's values have really shaped the direction it's gone in.
B.G. SR.: The other person who would be on that list, by the way, would be Melinda Gates, who is more than just a daughter-in-law. She's a friend, and she brings wisdom to the table.
Bill, as you move from Microsoft to the foundation world, from computer science to natural sciences and beyond, have you gotten advice and learned new things from this whole new group of people that you now associate with?
B.G.: Yeah, it's a different world, and you want to make sure you're bringing what's good about the business environment and the kind of engineering world that I spent most of my life in, and abandoning some elements that aren't going to work.
What about advice or lessons learned as you were growing Microsoft from say, Andy Grove or people at IBM?
B.G.: We learned [a lot] about quality control, particularly from IBM Japan. Our Japanese customers on the whole were so tough about quality and precision -- that was fantastic, because we did a lot of business there early in our existence. Intel (INTC, Fortune 500), we kind of grew up with together. Andy would sometimes be very friendly, offer good advice. Sometimes he was very tough on us. But it was all very helpful. I mean, he's brilliant. And he helped us think about things in new ways. Apple (AAPL, Fortune 500) is a competitor, but in terms of getting the Macintosh to critical mass, Microsoft was the key partner who had all the early software. You know, that was an interesting learning curve. Working with Steve Jobs is also exciting and not totally predictable, but he was brilliant and inspired us in a lot of ways.
Is there anything you specifically learned from Steve Jobs over the years?
B.G.: Well, Steve's kind of a fanatic about things, and you know, I think fanaticism is underrated. I'm a fanatic about running the engineering groups and the quality of them. Steve is a fanatic about the user experience and the design, and it clearly has made a huge difference for Apple that he says that it all has to come together -- not some committee-type view that has a list of things, but rather a holistic view. That's a deep insight.
Do you guys celebrate Father's Day? What do you guys do to mark that day?
B.G. SR.: We do birthdays and things like that pretty assiduously, but Father's Day, we've occasionally had a dinner or something
B.G.: Yeah, we always talk on the phone on Father's Day.
B.G. SR.: Yes, we do.
B.G.: Our rituals are more around Thanksgiving, birthdays, July 4th, Christmas. But it's a nice opportunity to call dad and tell him he's been [an] amazing father and set an incredible example.

Melinda Gates

Melinda Gates
Melinda gates

Melinda French Gates is an American businesswoman ,philanthropist and wife of Microsoft’s founder Bill Gates.They met in 1987 at a Microsoft press event in Manhattan, New York.Bill proposed marriage to Melinda in 1993 when he secretly diverted a chartered plane they were taking home from Palm Springs one Sunday night to land in Omaha. Warren Buffett met them there, arranged to have a jewelry store open, and helped them pick a ring, romantic, isn’t it? They married on January 1, 1994 on the Hawaiian island of Lanai in a $ 1 million wedding ceremony at Manele Bay Hotel.For wedding day Bill rented every hotel room at the hotel (250 rooms) and chartered every helicopter close by.Bill and Melinda are happy parents of three children:
After graduation Melina joined Microsoft and participated in the development of many of Microsoft’s multimedia products including Publisher,Microsoft Bob, Encarta, and Expedia.She was ranked #40 in Forbes magazine list of the 100 Most Powerful Women in 2008, #24 in 2007, and #12 in 2006. With her husband bill gates she founded the largest transparently operated private foundation in the world, called Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.The primary aims of the foundation are, globally, to enhance healthcare and reduce extreme poverty, and in America, to expand educational opportunities and access to information technology.

 

Monday, September 17, 2012

bill gates family pictures


bill gates family pictures
bill gates family pictures
bill gates family pictures
bill gates family pictures


bill gates family pictures
bill gates family pictures
bill gates family pictures


bill gates family pictures
bill gates family pictures
bill gates family pictures

Monday, June 18, 2012

bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates


bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

That's my girl! Billionaire Bill Gates cheers on daughter, 15, at horse riding show... after spending $1m on Florida mansion and private jets to help her pursue equestrian dream

Bill Gates has indulged his teenage daughter's love of horse riding by spending $1million on a rented mansion close to an equestrian festival.
Jennifer Gates, 15, was pictured showing off her horse jumping skills at the weekend during an equestrian show in Palm Beach, Florida.
The billionaire Microsoft founder was said to have signed a six-month lease on a palatial premises  so that his daughter can compete in the event over spring break. 

Expensive hobby: Jennifer Gates shows off her horse jumping skills during an equestrian show in Palm Beach, Florida at the weekend
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

Expensive hobby: Jennifer Gates shows off her horse jumping skills during an equestrian show in Palm Beach, Florida at the weekend
Bill Gates' wife Melinda and 13-year-old son Rory where also at the show to cheer on the teenager.
The family watched intently as Jennifer took part in the Winter Equestrian Festival which runs until April 1. It hosts 5,000 horses and 2,800 riders from 49 states and 30 countries.
Miss Gates was competing in one of the children's jumping divisions, Equestrian Sport Productions spokeswoman Jennifer Wood confirmed to MailOnline.
It costs $45 each time to enter a division and prize money is between $1,500 - $2,000.
Her father, America's richest man, was said to have rented a 7,300 sq ft house with eight bedrooms and its own equestrian facilities for $600,000. The property in Wellington, Florida is worth $12.9million.

Proud parents: Bill and Melinda Gates have spent a reported $1 million so that their daughter Jennifer can pursue her equestrian dreams
bill gates and melinda gates

Proud parents: Bill and Melinda Gates have spent a reported $1 million so that their daughter Jennifer can pursue her equestrian dreams
Family vacation: Melinda Gates (left) leans in to speak to her son Rory alongside a friend and husband Bill at the Florida horse show
gates family

Family vacation: Melinda Gates (left) leans in to speak to her son Rory alongside a friend and husband Bill at the Florida horse show
Concentration: Miss Gates has taken part in junior divisions at the equestrian show in Florida
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

Concentration: Miss Gates has taken part in junior divisions at the equestrian show in Florida
Rising star: Jennifer competed in junior divisions but her father Bill has already spent approximately $75,000 on each of her horses
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

Rising star: Jennifer competed in junior divisions but her father Bill has already spent approximately $75,000 on each of her horses
Although Candice Cerro, from move.com, could not confirm to MailOnline that the Gates family rented the home, she said that the listing for the property was no longer on the market.

Gates then leased four, elite jumping horses for $50,000 to $75,000 each for the girl to ride. Another $50,000 has been forked out on stables along with hiring the best trainers.
On top of this, there have been three private jet trips to ferry the family back and forth to Washington State, where their main residence sits on the edge of Lake Washington in Medina.
The Florida home has eight bedrooms, a barn, stables and horse training area and a guarded access road, according to Gawker. It also boasts a wine cellar and media room.
The Microsoft founder reportedly has an option to buy the house at the end of the lease.
While his daughter was competing in the prestigious event, the Microsoft boss and philanthropist was at times engrossed in The Quest - a book about global energy and its changing role in the economy and political sphere.
Talented: The family have been shuttling between their main home on Lake Washington in private jets to a rented mansion near Palm Beach so Jennifer can compete in the Winter Equestrian Festival
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

Talented: The family have been shuttling between their main home on Lake Washington in private jets to a rented mansion near Palm Beach so Jennifer can compete in the Winter Equestrian Festival

Thanks, dad: Jennifer Gates, 15, chats to her father Bill sitting beside the girl's mother Melinda in a golf buggy during the family day out on Sunday
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

Thanks, dad: Jennifer Gates, 15, chats to her father Bill sitting beside the girl's mother Melinda in a golf buggy during the family day out on Sunday

Mother and daughter: Jennifer Gates (left) has been provided with elite jumping horses by her father Bill while mother Melinda (right) monitors the course closely
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates
Mother and daughter: Jennifer Gates (left) has been provided with elite jumping horses by her father Bill while mother Melinda (right) monitors the course closely
melinda gates
Mother and daughter: Jennifer Gates (left) has been provided with elite jumping horses by her father Bill while mother Melinda (right) monitors the course closely
Distracted: Billionaire Bill Gates takes a break from the horse riding activities to read The Quest - a book about global energy and its role in geopolitical and economic change
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

Distracted: Billionaire Bill Gates takes a break from the horse riding activities to read The Quest - a book about global energy and its role in geopolitical and economic change

Call the fashion police: Bill Gates, America's richest man, blends into the Florida crowd (left) while daughter Jennifer makes a call... but is it still the iPhone she was spotted with at Christmas?
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates
Call the fashion police: Bill Gates, America's richest man, blends into the Florida crowd (left) while daughter Jennifer makes a call... but is it still the iPhone she was spotted with at Christmas?
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates
Call the fashion police: Bill Gates, America's richest man, blends into the Florida crowd (left) while daughter Jennifer makes a call... but is it still the iPhone she was spotted with at Christmas?
The FTI Consulting Winter Equestrian Festival runs from January 11 until April 1 and sees riders from more than 30 countries compete in 70 divisions.

There are 12 competition arenas and 5,000 horses show at the three-month event.

There is $6million of prize money on offer to competitors and among the over-18 divisions, Olympic coaches closely monitor the trials for their next sporting stars.
Bill Gates is the second wealthiest person in the world, worth $62.4billion according to Bloomberg, after Mexican telecommunications magnate Carlos Slim.
Gates married Melinda French on January 1, 1994. Two years later, they had their first daughter Jennifer Katharine. Son Rory John followed in 1999 and and Phoebe Adele in 2002.
Luxury: Bill Gates is renting this $600,000-a-month mansion in Wellington, Florida, so his daughter can be near the horse show in Palm Beach
Luxury: Bill Gates is renting this $600,000-a-month mansion in Wellington, Florida, so his daughter can be near the horse show in Palm Beach
Media room: This room has a giant projector screen on the wall, along with plenty of seating
Media room: This room has a giant projector screen on the wall, along with plenty of seating
Lap of luxury: The 7,352 sq ft mansion also has an obligatory swimming pool. Gates has the option to buy the home at the end of the family's stay
Lap of luxury: The 7,352 sq ft mansion also has an obligatory swimming pool. Gates has the option to buy the home at the end of the family's stay
Al fresco: The rental home has been leased for six months, and will allow Jennifer Gates, 15, to compete in the nearby Winter Equestrian Festival in Palm Beach
bill gates daughter - jennifer katharine gates

Al fresco: The rental home has been leased for six months, and will allow Jennifer Gates, 15, to compete in the nearby Winter Equestrian Festival in Palm Beach